DSN Announces the 2017 Best Places to Work in Direct Selling

Building on the positive results from its inaugural year, Direct Selling News has partnered once again with the employee engagement experts at Quantum Workplace to identify the Best Places to Work in Direct Selling. The contest was open to all direct selling companies headquartered in North America and having at least 50 employees.

The 2017 honorees for the Best Places to Work in Direct Selling are listed below in alphabetical order. All of these companies are equal honorees and are recognized collectively as the Best Places to Work within the direct selling channel.

Click here to view the honorees.

 

The Social Age

by Andrea Tortora

Click here to order the January 2016 issue in which this article appeared or click here to download it to your mobile device.


The Social Age is here. If you’re not taking full advantage of the tools and technologies that social platforms have to offer, you and your company are likely to be left behind as the competition leaps ahead. Now well into its infancy, the Social Age is and will be making a tremendous impact on the sales industry, especially within the world of direct selling. The changes already cannot be ignored.

Technology drives everything—recruitment, retention and revenue—for most companies. Those businesses that realize what they can achieve when all of their internal, back office, social media, field tools and software systems work together are equipped to innovate and leverage essential data that will let them thrive in the future.

Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Pinterest and Instagram are potent tools that companies and consultants are learning to use as they build connections with customers and grow sales. Other apps such as Periscope and Google Hangout are gaining traction, too. Yet many executives and companies are slow to embrace these advances. A study from CEO.com and Domo finds that 68 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs have no social media presence. Among the 30 percent who do, they only use one social channel. Here LinkedIn was the chosen platform.

In contrast to that study, it does appear that C-level executives within direct selling are more plugged in to the benefits of these engagement tools. A recent study conducted among members by the U.S. Direct Selling Association (DSA), titled The 2015 Managing Your Company’s Web Presence and Technology Systems Survey, indicates that nearly six in 10 companies surveyed report that one or more of their chief-level executives have company-associated social media accounts that they actively engage in
(57 percent).

Additionally, over half of those also indicate that the chief executives create the content for those accounts. At Scentsy, the Idaho-based wickless candle company, it’s common for an executive to personally respond to field achievements or post in conversations on Facebook, the social media platform most used by Scentsy Consultants.

Rick Stambaugh, Chief Information Officer at Utah-based company USANA, refers to the focus of today as “Digital Humanism.” He says, “The consumer-driven Internet of things has many components, but the most prominent one is social.”

As direct sellers work toward more fully embracing the Social Age and everything that comes with it, a few things are clear…

Click here to read the full article in Direct Selling News.

Supply Chain Basics: Managing Third Party Logistics and Embracing Technology

by Noel Datko

Defining Today’s 3PL Relationship

Meeting the demands of an ever-changing global marketplace is a challenge for many of today’s businesses. Changes in the transportation landscape, advancements in technology and globalization are pressing business leaders to analyze their operations and achieve new efficiencies to minimize risk. As a result, top companies around the globe are increasingly leaning on third party logistics companies to manage their supply chains.

According to an Armstrong & Associates report, 86 percent of domestic Fortune 500 companies use 3PLs for logistics and supply chain functions. Initially, companies outsourced these functions in order to increase in-house efficiencies and reduce their overall logistics spend. Next was the need to expand to foreign markets, reduce waste and answer to a growing number of impatient customers. Today, technology plays a much larger role in the operations of successful 3PLs, and is integral to the success of their clients.

What does this modern-day third party relationship look like for your business? Here are a few things to consider when selecting a provider.

Global Partnerships

Going global is complex and presents many hurdles for businesses. Unfamiliar sources of supply, transportation and economic regulations, advanced security processes and international compliance issues are all considerations when doing business internationally. Successful 3PLs are able to leverage global partnerships to provide the resources, expertise and infrastructure necessary for expanding your global reach.

Investments in Technology

Companies looking for a 3PL to help expand their market should look for providers with advanced technical capabilities and solutions. The diversity of technology required to track products from manufacturer to consumer, particularly with international supply chains, is costly and prohibitive for many businesses. A truly global 3PL makes regular investments in technology to support the unique supply chain strategies posed by different regions of the world.

Strategic Relationships


A modern day 3PL should be committed to providing value to the customer and looking out for their best interests.


Partnerships in today’s environment are becoming more consumer-centric. A modern-day 3PL should be committed to providing value to the customer and looking out for their best interests. This requires an emphasis on building long-term relationships and offering ways to transform and collaborate. By communicating on a regular basis to talk about the client’s business and how it’s being impacted by changing market conditions, both parties will achieve greater success, and the partnership grows.

Important Skills for Your 3PL

Your 3PL partner is crucial to your success in the industry; evaluation of potential partners needs to go far beyond basic cost, to look at what skills and knowledge your 3PL can truly offer.

Consider these five skills when you’re evaluating potential new partners.

  1. Adaptation and Evolution. Your 3PL must demonstrate a commitment to continuous improvement right out of the gate. Look at things like how many continuous improvement projects your potential partner has in the works, how many they initiate and how many they complete. Consider also whether they invest in formal training programs, how many Six Sigma Black Belts they have on staff, and any industry awards they’ve received for their continuous improvement projects and innovations. If your potential 3PL doesn’t have the ability, and the drive, to not only keep up with industry standards but exceed them, your relationship is set up for failure.
  2. Visibility. One of your biggest challenges is gaining and controlling supply chain visibility—especially as supply chains go global and processes become even more complex. You need insight into every stage of the supply chain, including lead times, landed costs, inventory carrying costs, and obsolescence costs, as well as the quality of your 3PL’s customer service. Can they give you that kind of visibility? Do they have the technology and skills in place to provide real collaboration, or are you likely to be left groping in the dark while they try to get their act together when you need information?
  3. IT Innovation. Why do companies complain about the length of time it takes their 3PL to make or enable process changes? Over and over it’s the fact that their 3PL uses an old, outdated, slowly dying IT infrastructure. The 3PL you choose should show that they are up-to-date with their software, and that their staff, both in the server room and on the floor, is familiar with technology innovations and can keep pace as they continue to evolve.
  4. Smart Hiring and Smart Retention. There’s a shortage of supply chain and logistics talent. Is your potential 3PL facing that issue? Or do they invest in hiring smart and fostering talent internally? Do they focus on developing their employees’ communication and relationship management skills? Do they understand the importance of having skilled and knowledgeable people at every level of the organization, who understand your industry thoroughly?
  5. Business Intelligence and Insights. Your 3PL needs to offer more than just access to business intelligence dashboards. Every piece of software nowadays offers that. What you need from your 3PL is insight. They should be staying on top of leading industry practices and trends, plus be able to offer networking and knowledge-exchange possibilities with other shippers. They should have the ability to conduct extensive market research and both share and implement their findings. If your 3PL has a dashboard but no idea how to leverage it, in the end you’re gaining very little from that relationship.

Just as the world is constantly evolving and changing, so are your logistics needs. A modern-day 3PL will rise to the challenge and apply their supply chain expertise and resources to enhance your business operations. If you are ready to expand your market or make investments in new technology, reach out to an expert who can reduce costs, improve service and achieve better visibility of the components that drive a global supply chain.


Working Smart


Technology Continues to Transform Today’s Supply Chain

Today’s business leaders are faced with the task of creating more efficient processes while keeping costs down. In order to stay competitive in a digital age, they need to stay aggressive in transforming their supply chains, and budget remains a barrier for many. Even during economic slumps, however, companies continue to invest in technology with the goal of improving business processes and increased profitability when times improve.

A recent Gartner’s user survey reveals supply chain managers are fighting for … Click here to read the full article on Direct Selling News.

 

 


Noel Datko is Marketing Director at IntegraCore LLC, a company that offers outsource turnkey fulfillment center and distribution warehousing services.

Direct Selling Cannot Be Defined by Words or Numbers Alone

DSA

Click here to order the February 2014 issue in which this article appeared or click here to download it to your mobile device.


In some respects, there has been an unprecedented amount of attention focused on direct selling by media and the financial community lately. This has also been a unique time for in-depth research undertaken by the Direct Selling Association in an effort to quantify many aspects of the business model. Beginning with the Consumer Attitudes Survey in late 2012 and continuing in 2013 with the annual Growth & Outlook Survey, National Salesforce Survey and Sales Strategy Survey, DSA took a 360-degree look at the sales channel.

The result will be an enhanced ability to address misstatements and misinformation in the marketplace that can so easily cloud the perception of a sales channel that relies primarily on word-of-mouth instead of catchy advertising jingles and expensive retail shelf space.

But at the heart of all of the averages, percentage breakdowns and statistical analysis remain the stories of 16 million Americans—and millions more around the world—who look to direct selling to fulfill a particular need, whether financial or otherwise. While we stock our arsenal with facts and figures, we must not lose sight of the personal, human stories that form the basis of direct selling.

The following are but two examples of real stories that bring DSA’s research to life:

What the numbers say:
Fifty-seven percent of direct sellers report having signed up with their company to get the products at a discount, while 62 percent report continuing as a direct seller for this reason. Forty-eight percent of direct sellers report becoming a direct seller because they were seeking long-term supplemental income, but 62 percent report continuing as a direct seller for that same reason. Further, 23 percent of sellers said they started in direct selling hoping to make it a career, but 41 percent of sellers report continuing with direct selling as a career.

What sellers say:
Anita R., Battle Creek, Mich.: “I joined to get the discount, and what I found was a full-time job!”

What the numbers say:
Seventy-eight percent of direct sellers say direct selling has met or exceeded their expectations, and nearly the same percentage of direct sellers say they are likely to recommend that a friend or family member become a direct seller.

What sellers say: 
Suzy F., Hudson, Wis.: “My experience with direct selling/network marketing has been nothing less than positive. I must admit that I was skeptical at first. However, I decided to educate myself about the industry and have determined it is a worthy profession that offers many personal and professional rewards.”

These findings and the complementary “real person” stories are of little surprise to those who have seen and experienced firsthand how direct selling changes lives. Numbers alone may be able to accurately describe some industries, but for a sales channel that is defined by so much more than profits, to omit the personal anecdote is to remove the essence of the direct selling experience.

Perhaps this is one of the reasons direct selling is so often undervalued and criticized by Wall Street, while 16 million people and their customers embrace it on Main Street. To this end, DSA is committed to a proactive campaign of pairing recent research findings with the real-life stories of those whose lives have been changed by direct selling, including highly influential legislators, regulators and business community leaders who support the channel.

Direct selling cannot be described with words or numbers alone. Each provides context for the other. We are all well-served to share these stories, to represent the men and women who rely on their independent direct selling businesses for income and personal achievement. It is our job to understand their needs and to recognize that, for so many, the intangible benefits of a career in direct sales mean so much more than the tangible rewards. And so often those intangible benefits go unreported and unappreciated. We hear so much about earnings statements, stock ratings, and recruitment and retention figures that we lose sight of what makes this industry so special. In 2014, join DSA in its efforts and rededicate yourself and your company to telling the story of direct selling.


Joseph N. Mariano

Joseph N. Mariano is President of the U.S. Direct Selling Association.

The Synergy of Successful Styles Between Party Plan & Network Marketing Companies

by Barbara Seale

Even though most direct sellers classify themselves as either party plan companies or network marketers, the truth is that the lines aren’t so clear cut.

 

DSN October, 2013Take a lingering look at many companies in the industry and you’ll find that many use predominantly one style or another, but they aren’t at all rigid about it. They’ve often adopted an element or two from the other style, and they don’t see it as so unusual. It just works for them. It’s all part of the big, blended direct selling family.

When asked about their practices, companies in this story proactively called themselves “hybrids.” But every company noted that their sales and recruiting styles were developed because they made sense for them. In fact, those practices have resulted in solid finances and growth that any company would covet.

Princess House President and CEO Connie Tang is a veteran in the industry, having held several executive positions before taking the helm at Princess House last year. She notes that party plan companies developed as an opportunity for women to earn a little “fun money.” The focus was on selling products at a home party, not on recruiting. While consultants did build teams, they often focused more on sales. But today’s party plan company, including Princess House—especially since Tang arrived—has evolved to look a little more like a network marketing company than it did a generation or two ago. The simple reason:economics.

“Part of what has continued to push that evolution is the need to be competitive from a business development and comp plan perspective,” Tang says. “This diversification came to fruition because of the need for companies to have long-term prosperity, so it’s been like investing in our own portfolio.”


Today’s party plan company has evolved to look a little more like a network marketing company than it did a generation or two ago. The simple reason: economics.


Recruiting Revolution

She notes that when party plan consultants broaden their practices beyond finding hostesses and holding parties—and they grow by building teams and coaching new recruits—they accomplish a couple of important things. First, they increase their immediate earnings opportunity beyond what they can produce by their individual efforts. Second, and just as importantly, they protect their business from unpredictable factors such as economic downturns. It’s good for the consultant and good for the company. Tang shifted the focus at Princess House to place more emphasis on recruiting, holding network marketing-style hotel opportunity meetings and training consultants to talk a bit more about the company’s earnings opportunity during parties, even as they sold its high-quality, durable products.

“We had to find ways to reach more consumers,” Tang says. “When we focus more on sponsoring, then we have more ambassadors out there building the business.”

That seemingly simple shift in focus produced impressive results. Princess House said Happy New Year in 2013 to 40 percent more consultants than it had a year before.

For Tastefully Simple too, recruiting gets started at parties where guests nibble from the company’s wide selection of convenient, easy-to-prepare foods designed to help people spend less time in the kitchen and more time enjoying the rest of their lives. Tastefully Simple has two types of gatherings. Relax and Savor is a traditional party where consultants share products and information and then take orders at the end of the party; and Mix and Mingle is a less-used and less-formal come-and-go gathering where guests and consultants float from product area to product area, socializing, snacking and sometimes selling each other on delicious products. In both, the focus is on product sales and social interaction.

“We’re clearly a party plan company,” says Travis Bautz, the company’s Vice President of Marketing. “We’ve done a fair amount of research on the whole party dynamic to try to understand where people draw value from it. For us, they’re social reasons, learning reasons and product reasons,” he explains. “The trick is how to deliver a great experience when people have increased pressure on their time.”



Even for a proud party plan company committed to group selling, one-on-one interactions are still part of the process.


Passive Sales, Positive Profits

Tastefully Simple relieves some of that pressure by offering something more associated with network marketing companies: an auto-ship program called Simply Stocked. With about 40 standard products included, the program is highly customer-centric. Users can choose whether their favorite products are shipped to them every two, three or four months, and they can change their order at any time. While most sales are made at parties, the Simply Stocked program adds an element of predictability to consultant commissions, making life even simpler for customers.

Bautz admits, though, that even for a proud party plan company committed to group selling, one-on-one interactions are still part of the process.

“That’s especially true on the business opportunity side,” he notes. “For us, those conversations often start as a party interaction and finish as one-on-one. At parties, there are small conversations—we call those ‘sprinkles,’ references to the business opportunity that lead to an opportunity to talk one-on-one with the guest later.”

As much as Tastefully Simple and Princess House are clearly party plan proponents, a few companies in the industry are harder to classify.

“We were hybrid when hybrid wasn’t cool,” says Arbonne Senior Vice President and Chief Sales Officer Heather Chastain. “It’s an example of how Arbonne has always been a little ahead of the times. We recognized 15 or 20 years ago that it isn’t just one or the other. We’ve always had hostesses as an element of our plan, but we eschew party language. We refer to them as group presentations. But our history is that we’ve always used a combination of methods.”


“When you’re offering multiple ways of doing business, you’re giving consultants great ways to overcome common objections.”
—Heather Chastain, Senior Vice President and Chief Sales Officer, Arbonne


Chastain notes that the flexible sales approach was developed to adapt to the needs of customers. Whether consultants talk to their customers one-on-one or in a group presentation, they’re making a business decision based on customer preferences. But whether the discussion is between two people or 20, Chastain notes that it’s still about people, products and opportunity. It’s just a question of emphasis.

“When you have those three things, it’s usually a matter of where you start,” she says. “A one-on-one conversation typically starts with opportunity. A party starts with products. But ultimately, from start to finish, you’re still hitting all the elements.”

Having options for how consultants run their businesses helps them be successful, and Chastain notes that most successful consultants run a pretty evenly balanced business. Arbonne’s data shows that about 60 percent of their business comes from individual discussions.

“When you’re offering multiple ways of doing business, you’re giving consultants great ways to overcome common objections,” she notes. “You don’t have to ask people to hold parties if they don’t want to. Make it work for you.”

Arbonne’s hybrid system works for them; 2012 net sales were $377 million, up from $353 million in 2011.



Party—A Lot

Self-proclaimed hybrid Vemma is a network marketer that builds its fast-growing business through get-togethers it calls home events, even though they’re often not held in homes. The language was carefully chosen to be inclusive and appealing to the broad demographics of its distributors, or Brand Partners, especially the youthful cadre that builds businesses on Vemma’s energy drinks. Their version of a “party” has revolutionized the term.

“The word meeting sounds boring to a lot of people, and a party, well, it’s much more than that to us,” says Mark Patterson, Vemma Executive Vice President, Marketing and Brand Development. “One of the biggest changes for us is the frequency of them. I just came from a big event where I heard kids saying, if you really want to ignite your business, have at least two home events a day. Many shoot for five. Lots of people hearing that would think they were crazy, but these kids are just actively seeking three to five people. They don’t plan the events. They just use social media to say things like, ‘I’ll be here, here and here today. If you’re interested in doing more or being healthier, meet me there.’ ”


While their fellow distributors from an earlier generation hold more traditional Vemma tasting parties, millennial distributors’ events may be as short as 15 minutes.


The “kids” Patterson is talking about are Vemma’s Young People Revolution (YPR), an exploding group of millennials whose leaders coined the term The Five M’s—More Meetings Make More Money. While their fellow Brand Partners from an earlier generation hold more traditional tasting parties, the YPRs move fast. Their events may be as short as 15 minutes. In addition to making heavy use of social media, they use Vemma’s business app to send texts—the preferred communication method for their generation—to their contacts. The text may include a video of an experienced leader making a simple business presentation. With the business side of the “home meeting” already in place, they can appear with their cooler of Verve products, tell their story, maybe show their new car and close the deal.

“Our recruiting effectiveness has skyrocketed by doing these kinds of things,” Patterson says. “Our new focus is on helping to foster and train new people coming in to be leaders themselves. The rapid personal development and the excitement among this group are amazing. The other benefit of frequent, small home events is that the more you do it, the better you become at it, and that makes you more effective.”

Even though many events are held on the go, Brand Partners actually do hold events in homes, as well as in larger public places, often collaborating with other distributors to maximize impact.

“We encourage people and teach them that we’re all on one team,” Patterson says. “When we’re united, we can do many more things. I’ve seen one of our stronger Brand Partners holding a big meeting and people from a variety of teams coming together. The combination of stories is powerful, and the meetings are very inspirational.”

Explosive Growth


Scott Schwerdt, Nu Skin’s President of its Americas Region, says that regardless of a company’s marketing methodology, it’s still all about customer acquisition.


They’re also inspiring explosive growth. Vemma recently announced that sales reached a record-breaking $20 million a month in July. After taking seven years to reach the $10 million monthly sales mark in July 2012, Vemma has now doubled that just 12 months later. In addition, Vemma monthly customer and Brand Partner enrollments reached the 30,000 mark for the first time this July.

Industry stalwart Nu Skin has always walked the party plan/network marketing line, driven by its lineup of demonstrable products. Scott Schwerdt, Nu Skin’s President of its Americas Region, says that regardless of a company’s marketing methodology, it’s still all about customer acquisition.

“For as long as I can remember—and I’ve been with the company for 25 years—our distributors have always used home parties to demonstrate products,” Schwerdt says. “That method is particularly applicable for products that provide immediate results. That’s been our hallmark from when we were founded in 1984 until today.”

Schwerdt says that the company doesn’t call itself a hybrid, though. Nu Skin is a social business model that uses network marketing as a method of compensation for customer acquisition. Host-driven home parties are simply part of the company’s business method.

“On their own, our distributors will take the initiative to provide gifts to hosts or to do trade shows,” he says. “They’ll use any initiative they can in order to get their business in front of customers.”

Nu Skin’s most profitable draw is its auto-ship program. An astonishing 72 percent of all shipments are on the auto-ship program. While that number indicates strong customer loyalty, it also provides both the company and its distributors a predictable income. And that creates what all direct sellers want: retention. The thriving auto-ship program was a happy side effect of web technology.

Tech Leadership

Nu Skin has provided replicated websites to its distributors for almost 10 years, but over the last year has migrated toward mobile devices and apps. It already offers several Internet-related tools and continues to expand its mobile platform, providing distributors with an increasing number of methods to know exactly what their customers are doing so they can respond appropriately. The mobile platform works hand-in-glove with other products that open doors. Take the Biophotonic Scanner, an innovative tool Nu Skin developed to measure blood antioxidant levels without actually taking blood—an irresistible way to pique interest in Pharmanex supplements. In its first generation in 2003, “You almost had to move into someone’s house to do a scan,” Schwerdt jokes. Now in its third iteration, it’s smaller and operates using an iPad and a Bluetooth connection, making it the perfect conversation starter for spontaneous one-on-one interactions.

“You can do a scan any place in 30 seconds now,” he says. “It’s an instant-on device they can pack in their purse or briefcase. We have distributors who are scanning on planes, even hotel lobbies.”

The combination of technology, group sales and a strong auto-ship program creates loyal customers as well as distributors who stick around. Everybody wins. That creates a strong revenue stream. In July, publicly traded Nu Skin announced that it is increasing its full-year 2013 revenue guidance by $320 million to between $2.83 billion and $2.86 billion. Revenue in 2012 was $2.17 billion.

Train for Success

Blended styles that result in fast growth arise from effective training. These companies make sure that their distributors know how to party and that they also know how to recruit. But Princess House ran into a challenge that every company would love to have. For years, the company had stellar skills at retaining distributors, giving it an experienced salesforce. When it started placing more emphasis on recruiting, its success in attracting so many new consultants changed the face of its salesforce. Consultants with relatively little experience needed to learn skills from the ground up—how to hold a party that results in sales, how to work with hostesses and also how to recruit. Princess House consultants typically recruit during individual conversations after a party, but less experienced consultants had to learn how to plant the opportunity seeds while they ran a party—a skill that can be tough to master. The company responded by revamping its training completely.


“We promote that talk about the opportunity happens throughout the course of the party. That allows people time to process and develop questions. It’s a very different goal than ‘I have to close the sale.’ ”
—Connie Tang, President and CEO, Princess House


“We just launched to our leadership group a completely new consultant success system that fine-tunes coaching on party behaviors,” Tang explains. “We promote that talk about the opportunity happens throughout the course of the party. That allows people time to process and develop questions. It’s a very different goal than ‘I have to close the sale.’ Planting those ‘whys’ in the conversation throughout the evening is one of those difficult, intangible skills to acquire, but that conversion is very important. That’s what we’re trying to teach.”

The skill is the same one Tastefully Simple teaches so its consultants can effectively drop “sprinkles” throughout a party.

“We train to that,” emphasizes Tastefully Simple’s Bautz. “We have a structure we recommend for the party with lots of examples of language and ways they can use ‘sprinkles’ and other techniques. The most value is to new consultants.”

Then when consultants follow up to talk opportunity individually, Tastefully Simple provides them with numerous tools—both print and online—to increase their comfort and to support the conversation.

No matter which camp a company identifies with, if they adopt a technique from the other method, it’s a practical decision that they adapt to fit their own culture. And why not? Direct selling is an industry that freely shares information and where member companies learn from each other.

Vemma’s Patterson says it well: “I don’t think people are opposed to adopting good ideas, no matter where they are. I think we’re in a society now where we’re very used to change, and this industry as a whole doesn’t mind adapting.”

No Lines

Retention | RevenueTwo-year-old Chloe + Isabel (C+I) defies description, at least in traditional direct selling terms. Neither party plan nor network marketer, it has an omni-channel approach, according to its Founder and CEO Chantel Waterbury. The company doesn’t just color outside the lines; it erases them.

“When I speak with people, even investors, about C+I, I say that we’re disrupting the direct sales industry,” Waterbury says. “But we are similar to other direct selling companies in that we’re an income opportunity for people. When I think about the heart and soul of the industry, they’re all offering opportunity through products.”

C+I’s distributors, called merchandisers, disrupt not only the direct selling industry but also the brick-and-mortar retail industry. They sell C+I’s jewelry primarily through online storefronts, social media, pop-up shops that provide a temporary physical presence, in-home parties if they wish, and by building an individual clientele. Most use a blend of techniques.

Waterbury developed C+I with tech-savvy Gen Y in mind, and virtually all merchandisers—average age of about 26—sell online through the company’s unique e-boutiques. The branded websites are completely customizable, allowing the merchandiser to choose collections, individual pieces of jewelry, or even tips on how to style the jewelry. As a result, every merchandiser’s site is unique, even while they maintain the Chloe + Isabel brand.

The company invests a lot in each merchandiser. First, prospects apply to become a merchandiser, and C+I interviews them to be sure they’re the right person for the opportunity. The next consideration is the market. C+I doesn’t want to oversaturate a given market and place merchandisers in competition with each other. About 15 percent of applicants are selected. The new merchandiser gets lots of corporate-led training. College students, whose needs are unique, get enrolled in a special training program called GEM, Growth and Empowerment through Merchandising. Every new merchandiser is assigned a mentor, who does everything from providing moral support to answering ad hoc questions, to connecting the new merchandiser with a like-minded community of other merchandisers. The mentor is an experienced merchandiser who has been promoted to that position.

“Through that process, we’re making sure they’re fully thinking about what this opportunity is, why they are choosing Chloe + Isabel, what their goals are and why they would be successful,” Waterbury explains. “We’re focused on everyone succeeding.”

The results? Just look at direct selling’s two Big R’s, retention and revenue.

“Let’s just say we’re not having a retention problem,” Waterbury says. “It’s so easy for [a merchandiser] to remain active. She is highly engaged with our community, so she’s going to be producing and selling. When she first comes to us, we’re asking, ‘Why are you here?’—they need to really clarify their ‘why.’ In that environment, there’s a difference in how someone treats it. They’re successful because they’re here for a reason. And with online boutiques, it’s easier to sell when you don’t have to do it in person all the time. She can wake up in the morning to an order.”

And the bottom line: revenue. Chloe + Isabel’s revenue in Q2 of 2013 was double that of the previous quarter.
For Chloe + Isabel, selling without borders is a successful way of life.