The New Talk Fusion Launches with Fresh Designs, Offerings

Moving at the speed of technology, Talk Fusion has overhauled its web-based business with fresh designs, product offerings and incentives. This week the video communications company unveiled its new look—and its new “Better with Video” slogan—during a Talk Fusion Dream Builder Broadcast by the company’s Founder and CEO, Bob Reina, and Vice President of Training and Development, Allison Roberts.

“At Talk Fusion, we’re constantly innovating, we’re constantly pushing the envelope to keep our video communication products exciting and ahead of the technology curve,” Reina told DSN. “This gives our Associates a huge competitive advantage with hot technology that’s the talk of the Internet.”

Talk Fusion’s newest offering is CONNECT Video Chat, an industry-first product that utilizes WebRTC to enable real-time video communication between any web browsers. Customers can try a free product demo via one of Talk Fusion’s newly redesigned websites, which introduce the company through videos in multiple languages.

The redesign extended to Talk Fusion’s full CONNECT suite of products, which features Video Email, Video Newsletter and Live Meetings as well as the chat tool. With its video communications technology, Talk Fusion has surpassed industry giants such as Yahoo, AOL, Viacom, CBS and MegaVideo to become the eighth-largest online video content provider in the world. Now in 140 countries, the company is setting its sights higher with a fresh look and innovative product offerings.

“Ultimately, our relaunch goal is to maximize the Talk Fusion brand worldwide, which has the additional benefit of helping our Associates achieve greater financial freedom,” said Reina.

As they build their businesses, Talk Fusion Associates will have the opportunity to earn new rewards for their work. The company has also revamped its compensation plan with incentives like Rolex watches, gold and diamond rings for milestone achievements, and a purchased Mercedes-Benz.

Video Vision at Talk Fusion

by Barbara Seale

Click here to order the January 2014 issue in which this article appeared or click here to download it to your mobile device.

Company Profile

  • Founded: 2007
  • Headquarters: Brandon, Fla.
  • Top Executive: Founder and CEO Bob Reina
  • Products: Web-based video communications services

It has been said that the most successful companies fill a need in the marketplace. Maybe that’s why 7-year-old Talk Fusion has grown so rapidly. Talk Fusion Founder and CEO Bob Reina got a personal glimpse of the market’s needs while he was on vacation in North Carolina in 2004. He toured a vacation home and considered purchasing it. He took a video of the home and tried to email it to friends. No go. The 10-second video file was too large for AOL to carry.

Bob Reina

Bob Reina

Reina began to think of how many other people had probably been faced with the same frustrating experience. And as he did, his inner entrepreneur kicked into high gear. He realized that he was looking squarely at a business opportunity that could have massive appeal. When he returned home, he talked with a friend he calls “an IT genius.” The friend figured out how to create video email, and Reina figured out how to turn the idea into a business—not just any business, but a direct selling business. In his mind, there was barely any choice. For years he had supplemented his income from his day job as a deputy in the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office with a substantial secondary income as a distributor in several direct selling companies. Reina had fallen in love with the industry, and he had learned to build large organizations. He knew direct selling’s power and potential, and he saw a match between the excitement of cutting-edge video technology and the reach of thousands of enthusiastic, hard-working distributors. In 2007, he launched Talk Fusion, offering its initial product to both individuals and businesses.

Since that launch, Reina’s vision for the future of video has proven correct. Just check out these numbers:

    • 92 percent of mobile video viewers currently share videos with others.
    • Online video now accounts for 50 percent of all mobile traffic and up to 69 percent of traffic on certain networks.

Auto Responder

  • People now watch about 6 billion hours of YouTube videos per month.
  • Video communication is poised to make up 90 percent of all online traffic by 2015.
  • Online video users are expected to double to 1.5 billion in 2016.

In just seven short years, Talk Fusion has become a leader in video emails and video newsletters, and it is the eighth-largest online video content provider in the world—surpassing respected industry giants such as Yahoo, AOL, Viacom, CBS and MegaVideo, Reina says proudly. But it also offers social media tools, video auto-responders, mobile applications, video conferencing and more.

“Six or eight years ago, people laughed at this idea,” he recalls. “They said video would never catch on, that it was a short-lived trend. But now the whole world is continuing to move more and more toward video, and we’re continuing to develop cutting-edge video technology for today’s marketplace—both personal and business.”

Mass Appeal Made Easy

Video has become widely used today, and Talk Fusion is part of the movement. That’s partly because it continues to develop new video technology applications, but it’s also because it abides by the direct selling mantra: Keep it simple. Talk Fusion makes its products easy to demonstrate and use. The combination makes Talk Fusion’s products attractive to customers and creates a magnetic opportunity for the company’s army of independent associates.

Even though millennials love video, Talk Fusion seems to appeal to every segment of the population. Reina believes video was an inevitable part of the evolution of communication mediation, beginning with the spoken word on radio, then moving pictures on television, then email carrying the written word—and now email, smartphones and tablets that carry video. He believes that nothing helps people or businesses communicate better than video.


Video Newsletters


In just seven short years, Talk Fusion has become a leader in video emails and video newsletters, and it is the eighth-largest online video content provider in the world.


“One of the challenges when I started the company was what vertical market to target,” Reina says. “The answer was: none. Any business or any person can be considered a prospect—both product-wise and opportunity-wise.”

Talk Fusion has made it easy for individuals and businesses to get started. Every product is web-based. Customers register online, instantly get an ID and password, log on to the video communications center and start using their product of choice immediately. Product tutorials are available in more than a dozen languages, and the products themselves are translated for the market where they’re sold.

Associates and customers quickly become experts and find new reasons to use the services. Families who traditionally sent their holiday newsletter as a story typed into an email message may morph it into a video newsletter. Proud parents may mark their child’s special birthday or graduation with a video documenting everything from birth to the big day. Realtors can promote new listings through video email or send a quick home tour to their clients’ smartphones. A broad range of large companies such as Norwegian Cruise Line, Applebee’s Restaurants, DHL and CIGNA Insurance Co. all use Talk Fusion products to reach and connect with online customers using the power of Talk Fusion’s email marketing. So does West Point Military Academy and numerous police departments and charities.

The range of uses and applications is one of the key attractions for Talk Fusion prospects. “The irony is that our associates are not necessarily into technology,” Reina notes. “Our products are fun and easy to use. They appeal to people of all ages, from very young to older, so the marketplace for our associates is vast. We’re proud that every product is designed to be simple so that the average person can use it.”

Instant Service, Instant Pay

And since people usually join direct selling companies to earn extra money, the Instant Pay feature of the company’s compensation plan gets their attention. The company deposits compensation into its associates’ Talk Fusion-branded Visa cards or electronic bank accounts. When an associate makes a sale, the customer can begin using their product immediately, and the associate’s commission is loaded to their account within three minutes. Binary, matching bonuses and almost every other element of compensation is paid instantly. And because each service has a monthly subscription rate, commissions are recurring, providing associates with a regular, reliable monthly income.

“We developed Instant Pay because what gets rewarded gets repeated,” Reina explains. “It gives people money for pressing needs. We’ve been doing this for about two years. It validates the business, speaks to the financial strength of the company and also creates an excitement factor that people are attracted to when they consider becoming a Talk Fusion associate.”

e-Sub-Forms

“We developed Instant Pay because what gets rewarded gets repeated.” —Bob Reina, Founder and CEO


The lure of Instant Pay is also tempered with practicality. In Talk Fusion’s recruiting materials Reina makes a point to set realistic expectations for any prospective independent associate. He is upfront, saying that direct selling is only an opportunity. Hard work, diligence, leadership and the willingness to learn and then teach others are all required. Even then, he says, a new associate should expect to work their business consistently for 7–10 hours a week for at least a year before they can realistically evaluate their prospects for long-term success. That straight talk gives Talk Fusion street cred, and the company works hard to maintain that trust.

“In our culture we’re very transparent,” Reina says. “Because I was in the field so long, I know what it takes to become successful. I don’t want anybody to become disappointed. If people put hard work into it, they have an opportunity to become successful. But if someone isn’t willing to work hard, I tell them please don’t join.” He adds, “That advice doesn’t eliminate the get-rich-quick idea, but they know where we stand on the matter. I think it’s important for Talk Fusion and for the reputation of the industry as a whole.”

Fast Forward to the Future

That hard-working culture has produced a fast-growing company, and Reina is bullish on its future. Talk Fusion already does business in more than 140 countries and, though Reina didn’t share revenue numbers, he says the company grew in 2012 by 42 percent over the prior year. While the domestic market continues to expand, growth is gaining momentum in international markets, especially Mexico, Brazil and other Latin American markets. Reina laughs that translations are one of his largest budget line items. The company’s global reach gives associates a virtually unlimited marketplace in which to build their business.

The company is poised to introduce a series of new products and technology in the immediate future. Talk Fusion CONNECT, a powerful three-in-one live broadcasting, video conferencing and desktop share product, was launched late last year. Its users: primarily businesses. Reina describes it as the first of its kind and predicts that it will become the company’s flagship product.

His goal for Talk Fusion is to keep changing as many lives as he can and to continue developing cutting-edge products. That means staying ahead of the fast-moving technology curve—not an easy task. But the company keeps tabs on industry, consumer and business trends, and it already has technology development offices in two states.

“We’re growing as a technology company, and we own and develop our own products,” Reina says. “We’re debt-free, and we’re growing in revenue and in marketplaces. This is the most exciting time ever for us.”

A Culture of Generosity

Talk Fusion’s Founder and CEO Bob Reina believes in sharing the fruits of his labor, and he encourages the company’s independent associates to follow his example.

“With great success comes greater responsibility,” he says.

Talk Fusion’s success—it has expanded to operate in 140 countries over its seven years and grew more than 40 percent last year—has allowed Reina and his company to support a variety of causes in its home state and beyond.

Bob Reina presents a $45,000 check to SPCA Florida to support animal welfare.


Reina is an animal lover who shares his home with several pets and on most days also shares his office with at least one. Many of his philanthropic efforts support animal welfare, including his quest to help build the Humane Society of Tampa Bay Animal Health Center sponsored by Talk Fusion, which has become a reality. Reina and Talk Fusion made a $1 million donation, followed a few months later by a $100,000 donation that represented $1,000 for each of the Humane Society’s 100 years of saving animal lives. Those donations inspired additional contributions from Talk Fusion associates from more than 30 countries. Other animal organizations, such as the SPCA Florida and no-kill shelter Critter Adoption and Rescue Effort (C.A.R.E.), are also beneficiaries of Talk Fusion’s support.

Humans benefit from Talk Fusion’s generosity, too. The company has supported programs that help at-risk youth and athletic programs for young people in nearby communities, and has helped individuals in crisis. In addition to its financial support, Talk Fusion lends its video capabilities to nonprofit organizations to help them with marketing and fundraising efforts.

Talk Fusion and its associates also take care of each other around the world. During a recent sales convention in Russia, Reina and Vice President of Training and Development Allison Roberts reminded the sold-out crowd of Talk Fusion’s commitment to giving back, telling the story of a Ukrainian associate whose young son suffers from debilitating spina bifida. They announced that Talk Fusion was working with Russian charitable organization RusFond to help raise awareness of the needs of children with spina bifida. Then they donated $40,000 for the child’s much-needed surgery. Talk Fusion associates from around the world immediately followed their example, giving a total of more than $80,000.

The company’s major gatherings routinely include an opportunity to give back. In Indonesia, associates who attended a sales conference were so inspired by the announcement of $100,000 to build a local orphanage that they donated an additional $30,000.

In another instance, when a gold-level associate became seriously ill, Reina, on behalf of Talk Fusion, surprised the associate with a check for $10,000 to help defray her medical expenses. Upon hearing the news, associates everywhere quickly moved to show their support, raising a total of more than $22,000.

“Sometimes worthwhile causes choose me,” Reina observes. “There’s a need that’s brought to my attention, and if I can help, I try to. I also encourage associates, as part of their growth process, to care about others more than themselves. It’s neat to watch what happens to people.”

Philanthropy is so important at Talk Fusion that one of Reina’s goals is to develop a foundation to handle the company’s charitable involvement. It already raises awareness of philanthropic gestures and needs through its dedicated website, TalkFusionGivesBack.com.

Katie Couric is America’s… Adrenaline Junkie?!

Katie Couric is America's... Adrenaline Junkie?!

Well-Being / Overcoming Obstacles

Katie Couric is America’s… Adrenaline Junkie?!

In her latest career tweak, Katie Couric hosts a talk show and busts through yet another comfort zone

For many talk-show hosts, a studio audience is an invitation to navel-gaze—to share every blip of the hosts’ weekends, love lives and moments with their adorable, talented offspring. But not for Katie Couric. “People want me to reveal things about myself in the course of the hour,” she acknowledges by phone, sitting in her dressing room on the set of her new show, Katie. “But even though I’m a major ham, I’m also a little hesitant about oversharing. I think that can be really off-putting. So I’ve had to be really balanced about revealing a little bit about me or my background that isn’t too much.”

While she has aired some personal issues during Katie’s first weeks—most notably a struggle with bulimia in her late teens and early 20s—she has done so with brevity that would baffle the likes of Kelly Ripa.

Her modesty is refreshing, but it’s also dialed a bit high, considering Couric is that rare celebrity whose story has plenty to teach the rest of us. Not only has she forged an enviable broadcasting career, with high-powered jobs at all three major TV networks, but she also has raised two daughters (who do, in fact, seem adorable and talented); survived the loss of her husband, a sister and her father with optimism seemingly intact; overcome that eating disorder; and weathered the sniping and scrutiny that have driven other celebrities to public, camera-smashing hissy fits.

How has Couric done it?

By many accounts—hers, friends’, colleagues’—the answer begins with Couric’s childhood in Arlington, Va. As she writes in her 2011 book The Best Advice I Ever Got, it was a Leave It to Beaver-style upbringing filled with track meets, cheerleading and piano lessons, plus the support of her parents and three siblings. And underpinning it were beliefs and values that, Couric and friends agree, guide her to this day:

Be brave.

It’s no coincidence that one of the first guests on Katie was Brené Brown, author of the book Daring Greatly. “When it comes to going for a job, a promotion or just about anything in life, I’m pretty convinced that the meek will not inherit the earth,” Couric writes in The Best Advice. She recommends finding a way to “stand out from the pack”—burning your résumé into a baseball bat when applying for a job with a baseball team, say, or choosing a personal “trademark,” à la chef Mario Batali’s orange clogs. “Whether you call it chutzpah, cojones… or one of my dad’s favorite words, moxie, it’s an essential ingredient for success.”

Even as a newly minted college grad, with her only professional experience a series of radio internships, Couric suffered no shortage of pluck. After cold calls and mailed résumés failed to land a TV job, Couric recounts in The Best Advice, she put on a blazer and turned up at the ABC News bureau in Washington, D.C. She phoned the operator from the waiting area and boldly asked to be connected to the executive producer of World News Tonight. After he answered, she parlayed a distant family connection into an invitation to come see him in the newsroom. The producer then led her to the office of the deputy bureau chief—and a few weeks later she was hired as a desk assistant by ABC.

Other gutsy moments have included Couric’s famously no-holds-barred interview with Sarah Palin in 2008, and in 1992, an impromptu 19 minutes with the first President Bush for Today. Couric had been finishing a White House interview with his wife, Barbara, when the president (who had declined Today’s request to speak with him) happened by. Couric promptly sprang into hard-news mode, grilling Bush on the Iran-Contra issue and other subjects despite his protests. “I think a lot of people would have been afraid to do that,” says weatherman Al Roker, who worked with Couric for 10 years on Today. The interview proved so compelling that executive producer Jeff Zucker aired the whole thing live, dropping planned segments of the show. “She was like a dog with a bone,” Roker says.

Such moments can give Couric the jitters—but within reason, she says, that’s a good thing. “Tony Bennett tells artists who come in to record a duet with him that if they weren’t a little nervous or afraid, it would mean they didn’t care,” she explains. “I have high standards, particularly for myself, and of course the possibility of not meeting them is scary. I just feel all your senses are heightened when you’ve got a case of the nerves—adrenaline, for me, makes me perform better.”

Nevertheless, nervous energy is just part of her secret.

Be prepared.

Former Girl Scout that she is, Couric believes that to make the most of opportunities—from spur-of-the-moment interviews to planned tête-à-têtes—she must do lots of homework. “She’s always very prepared to take advantage of what happens,” Roker says. “She was prepared for George Bush; she was prepared for Sarah Palin. She gives off this aura of being kind of scattered, ‘Aren’t I kind of wacky?’—but the fact is she’s very focused, very smart.”

At Katie, preparation means constant rounds of meetings, rehearsals, voice-overs, promo spots, and reading materials by and about her guests. It means doing a phone interview from her hair-and-makeup chair, flanked by stacks of newspapers, between a confab with her producers and a fitting for clothes to wear on the show. Small wonder that throughout Katie’s early weeks, she tended to sound a bit hoarse.

“She’s a very hard worker, no nonsense—she’s boom-boom-boom,” says fashion designer Carmen Marc Valvo, who has collaborated with Couric on cancer-awareness events. He has seen her among colleagues doing “a thousand things at once,” firm but smiling, not wasting a moment on second guesses. Case in point: When Couric chooses some of his dresses for future events. “She’ll say, ‘This is the White House dinner; this is the Met gala; this is the wedding in Virginia.’… She doesn’t have a lot of time on her hands.”

As you might expect, all that boom-boom-boom demands good fuel and a strong body. Fortunately, as Couric told the Associated Press in September, a therapist helped end her bulimic binge-purge cycle three decades ago. She has “learned how to have a much healthier relationship with food, and how to enjoy my life without obsessing about food.” Colleagues say Couric favors wholesome meals—tomato sandwiches, veggies from her garden. And she’s big on spinning classes, in which gym-goers pedal furiously on stationary bicycles. “It’s one of those exercise routines where you can’t kind of stop and say, ‘I’m tired,’ ” she told actress and social activist Marlo Thomas during a video chat.

Try something new.

After a career like Couric’s, many people would be tired. And if they had her kind of money (she made $15 million a year at CBS), they understandably might retire to a sunny island, tomato sandwich in hand.

Couric, naturally, is having none of that. Launching Katie in September, at age 55, was her latest in a string of leaps into the relative unknown—and her latest reason for being seen, in media circles, as a wiz at reinventing herself.

“I think I get more credit for reinvention than I really deserve,” Couric demurs. She has spent her whole working life in journalism, after all. “It’s not as if I was a teacher and one day I became a pharmaceuticals account executive and the next day an artist.” She has consistently chosen work that suits her “skill set” and fits in her “wheelhouse.”

Of course, that wheelhouse is big enough to steer an ocean liner. After her first desk-assistant job, Couric became a reporter in Washington and Miami, an editor at CNN, and a deputy Pentagon correspondent. She spent 15 years as (roll cliché) “America’s sweetheart” on NBC’s Today. She worked nearly five years at CBS, serving as the country’s first woman to anchor an evening news show, solo, as well as a correspondent for 60 Minutes—then left to develop Katie and become a special correspondent for ABC News. In October she debuted as a columnist for Woman’s Day magazine. Along the way, Couric has tweeted, blogged, Facebooked and webcast her way into our laptops and cellphones—all technologies she embraced before many of her TV counterparts.

“I think I’ve always tended to be a pretty forward-thinking person,” Couric says. Independent-thinking, too. While anchoring the news at CBS, she helped pioneer changes to the program—more interaction with correspondents and commentary from outsiders, for example. Though some were ultimately scrapped by the network, it seems clear that they helped prepare Couric to run a show of her own. “One of the reasons why doing this talk show appealed to me was… there were no rules,” she says. “My least favorite expression is ‘because that’s the way we’ve always done it here.’ [At Katie] we can do it the way we think best, not because it’s steeped in tradition.”

Finding her own way is demanding, and Couric likes that. “Working is my definition of ‘enjoying life,’ ” she writes in her first Woman’s Day column. “Most of the time, I feel like a 27-year-old in a 55-year-old’s body.” Leaving your comfort zone is scary, she writes, but trying something new “gives you the chance to surprise yourself and to find out what you’re made of.”

How has Couric surprised herself since starting Katie?

“I’ve learned that I have more stamina than I thought I would at this age!” Couric says. “And that I really, truly enjoy people. I had to travel a lot and talk about our goals in doing this show and though I sometimes dreaded it, I always ended up having so much fun. I really have learned you get from the world what you give out. And I’ve learned that I still have a great deal of curiosity about people, issues and the world. I’ve also realized that no matter what you’re doing, you can still learn a lot from people around you—and although it might be easier, it’s just impossible for everyone to like you.”

Keep your chin up.

Couric has faced more than her share of detractors, especially as CBS anchor. Media critics, and even some colleagues, griped about everything from her paycheck there to her manner of delivering the news. Her predecessor Dan Rather claimed CBS had hired her to “dumb down [the Evening News], tart it up in hopes of attracting a younger audience.”

But Couric is too competitive to let naysayers have the last word, close associates say. “That kind of [criticism] makes her stronger and more determined,” says Katie’s co-executive producer Michael Bass, who has worked with Couric on and off for two decades. “She went out and worked her butt off and did a much better show” at CBS, helping the network win prestigious journalism awards in the process. (Couric’s competitive streak could be seen more recently during a Katie segment in which she played pingpong against actress Susan Sarandon, Bass says. “Susan was probably being very nice to Katie, but Katie was very determined.”)

Her sense of humor helps, too. Colleagues agree that Couric’s wit keeps everyone’s spirits up—as does her penchant for pranks. On the Today set, Roker recalls, she was always ready if a co-worker forgot to log off a computer. “Katie would come in and send off wacky messages to the head of NBC news under your login—‘I’m really in the mood for brownies today!’ ” he says.

More than once, Couric has countered media complaints about her lack of gravitas by saying that “gravitas” is a “Latin word for ‘testicles.’ ” Not that she always laughs off insults, she admits. Some of the negative press “has hurt—but I think I’m comforted by the fact that most people who have achieved something in this world have faced the same things. Everybody gets their time in a barrel.… It’s in the fine print of being a successful person.”

Speaking of print, Couric has decided she has better things to do than sit around reading nasty comments about her. “I try to spend my life doing constructive things. It’s a great way to live. I highly recommend it.”

Does she mean that as a rebuke to her detractors?

“You can read between the lines,” Couric says with a chuckle.

Be generous.

One of Couric’s favorite constructive things is her charity work. Since her husband, Jay Monahan, died of colon cancer in 1998 at age 42, she has thrown herself into educating people about colorectal cancer and helped raise millions of dollars toward finding a cure. (Her famous on-air colonoscopy is credited with boosting colon screenings 20 percent.) She also has promoted awareness and treatment of pancreatic cancer, which killed her sister Emily in 2001; Parkinson’s disease, which led to her father’s death last year; and other illnesses including breast cancer.

Couric’s volunteering doesn’t just help others, she says. “It’s made a world of difference to me,” restoring her sense of purpose and optimism when life seemed bleakest. “In fact, when I meet other widows or people who’ve experienced the loss of somebody, I often say, ‘Do something. Organize something—a walk in your neighborhood. If you have kids, have a bake sale or raise money for cancer research or ALS or whatever.’ ” Her activism doesn’t keep her from missing Monahan, says Couric, who still thinks about her husband “all the time” and imagines how it would have been to raise their daughters together. But helping others does provide a healthy sense of partial control, she says. Plus, Couric believes a generous life is far more fulfilling and meaningful than a “self-focused” one. “You don’t have to try to cure cancer,” she says. “It could be helping a friend or making sure someone you love is OK if they’ve had an operation. There are big and small ways that your heart can be open to other people.”

Indeed, Couric’s colleagues say, her kindness comes in all sizes. If you work with her and a loved one is sick, she’ll hook you up with the right doctor. If you’re sad, she’ll lend an ear. If you’re getting back on your feet after an illness, she’ll accompany you to your first spinning class, cheering you all the way.

Though Couric may not be thinking of business with such gestures, they’re a professional boon nonetheless.

“You don’t engender loyalty like she has by shutting yourself off,” Roker says. “She makes herself available. She gives of herself; she makes sure people get their due.”

Stay connected, grateful and open to joy.

Couric has often found herself on the receiving end of generosity as well, she says—especially after losing her husband, sister and father.

“I always ask my friends for help,” Couric says. “I talk to them a lot about everything. When my dad died, I talked a lot to my friend Wendy, who had lost her mom. My sister Kiki and I talked all the time [about] how to help my mom, who is now living without my dad after being married for 67 years…. I have an incredible support system. I hope it’s because I’m a good friend and that’s why I have so many friends who are good to me. I think just having a safe place to unload, a grace period after a tough time personally and professionally, is what’s gotten me through.”

Like many who have suffered big losses, Couric finds herself with a sunnier perspective on what she still has. “I think in everyone’s life a little rain must fall,” she says, “and I think it has made me appreciate when things are good, and the positive things in my life.”

First among the positives: her surviving loved ones. No matter how busy Couric has been over the years, say friends and associates, she has always made time for those closest to her. When her daughters were little and she worked at Today, Roker says, she went to all their games and school assemblies. “You know how Michelle Obama says her main job is being Mom in Chief?” he says. “Katie’s was kind of like Mom Anchor in Chief.” These days, despite her packed schedule, Couric finds time to share meals with her girls or, say, drive her older daughter to college; while traveling for Katie, she has made side trips to visit her mother in Virginia. She goes to museums, lunches with friends, sees plays.

“If anything, Jay’s death and my sister’s death made me realize that, you know, we have to enjoy ourselves while we can,” Couric says—then begins racking her brain. The night before her interview with SUCCESS, she had been reading a book by a friend that began with a motto in Latin. Couric immediately googled it to find out what it meant. “It was something like, ‘When we live, we should really live.’ It sounds so cheesy and weird, but I thought, ‘That’s a good motto for life.’ ”

In this video from Katie, Katie Couric opens up about her next chapter as daytime talk show host, the loss of her husband Jay and raising her two daughters as a single mom.